Friday, July 12, 2019

How to easily make a photo slideshow on your Mac, for sharing all those images from your recent vacation - Business Insider

How to easily make a photo slideshow on your Mac, for sharing all those images from your recent vacation - Business Insider


How to easily make a photo slideshow on your Mac, for sharing all those images from your recent vacation - Business Insider

Posted: 11 Jul 2019 05:02 PM PDT

Photo slideshows can be a fun way to remember a trip, or any experience.

And if you have a Mac, making a slideshow - complete with background music and fun slide transitions - is exceedingly easy to do.

You can either build a slideshow from scratch, or have your Mac's Photos app make an "instant" one for you.

Check out the products mentioned in this article:

MacBook Pro (From $1,299 at Apple)

How to make a slideshow on a Mac

Provided you already know which photos you want to include in your slideshow, this should be a quick and easy process:

1. Go to the Launchpad (the rocket ship icon in your bottom toolbar) and select the Photos app.

Select the Photos app in the bottom right.
Devon Delfino/Business Insider

2. Select your photos (by clicking on the first one, then press and hold the Command key and click each subsequent photo you want in your slideshow).

3. In the top toolbar, select "File," then "Create," then "Slideshow," and finally "Photos."

Navigate over to Photos to add them to your slideshow.
Devon Delfino/Business Insider

4. Add your slideshow name - this will appear at the beginning of the slideshow, so you may wish to change it from the suggested date-based name Apple will give it - and click "Ok."

5. You can change the theme (like sliding panels or vintage prints), as well as the accompanying music and slide transitions, by clicking the icons on the right side of the slideshow.

Choose your theme on the right side of the screen.
Devon Delfino/Business Insider

6. When you're ready, click "Export" to change the saved location of your new slideshow, otherwise you'll be able to access it through the "My Projects" section of Photos.

If you need to reorder your photos, that's an easy task: Just click and drag each photo into the position you prefer.

How to play an instant slideshow on a Mac

You can select the theme and music for instant slideshows, but other than that, they aren't customizable. Here's how to make an instant slideshow:

1. Open the Photos app and, if necessary, click "Photos" in the sidebar, followed by "Moments" (located in the top toolbar of that window).

Find your photos in Moments.
Devon Delfino/Business Insider

2. Select some photos within one "Moment" (these are separated out according to date) — again, you'll need to click the first photo, then hold the Command key down while selected each additional photo.

3. In the top toolbar, click "File" and then "Play Slideshow."

4. In the pop-up slideshow window, select the theme and music.

Set your theme and music on the left side.
Devon Delfino/Business Insider

5. Click "Play Slideshow."

10 iconic businesses that made a comeback after struggling and sometimes nearly shutting down - Business Insider

Posted: 11 Jul 2019 03:02 PM PDT

Marvel, Netflix, Pabst Blue Ribbon, and the others on this list are so big, they're essentially unavoidable. But it wasn't always this way. All 10 companies faced an uphill struggle at some point. With the help of comic book fans, hipsters, TV junkies, and many others they were able to rebound and become more successful than ever.

Keep scrolling to learn more about these success stories.

Grabease Double Sided Toothbrush: a safe toothbrush with extra bristles - Business Insider

Posted: 11 Jul 2019 01:11 PM PDT

My 1-year-old daughter Ellie loves to "brush" her teeth. And by "brush," I actually mean hold the toothbrush while she sucks off all the toothpaste.

When I try to brush them for her, she usually gets upset and almost always put her tongue in the way. My usual plan of attack is to let Ellie hold her own toothbrush to distract her while I try to get in there with another toothbrush. When she gets distracted or moves her tongue out of the way, I use that opportunity to brush as many teeth as I can.

So when I heard about the Grabease double sided toothbrush from a press release, I was genuinely curious and intrigued. It turns out that the toothbrush was invented by 8-year-old Alma, the daughter of Grabease founder Maya Shalev, when she saw her mom struggling to brush her little brother's teeth.

When I was sent a sample of the toothbrush in the blush color, I was happy to try anything that might make brushing Ellie's teeth easier.

Read more: The best toothbrushes for kids you can buy

Design

If you have questions about when to start brushing your child's teeth or concerns about your child's oral development at all, talk to your pediatrician or schedule an appointment with a pediatric dentist.

Every parents' experience is going to be different, but I found that the design did help me have more success brushing Ellie's teeth.

When you only have about 10 seconds to get a toothbrush in a child's mouth, the more surface area there is, the more chances you have to actually brush a few teeth before a major meltdown happens. A lot of toddlers don't have the patience to stand in the bathroom and brush their teeth — they think one quick swipe of the toothbrush will do it. If you have a toddler like that, this toothbrush can help cut the time they spend brushing in half.

That because the design of the Grabease toothbrush is really unique and efficient.

It has a long tapered brush head, which makes it easy to get the bristles to the back of your baby or toddler's mouth, and double-sided bristles, which help you brush more teeth at once.

Whether I'm brushing Ellie's teeth for her or she's doing it herself, we can brush the top and bottom teeth at the same time and cut down on the overall time we need to spend brushing. The double-sided feature is also really helpful when Ellie bites down on the toothbrush. When she does that with a regular toothbrush, I can't pull it out of her mouth, but with this one, if I try pulling it out, the bristles will make contact with a few teeth along the way.

The toothbrush also features a short handle that makes it easy for Ellie to grab herself, and a choke guard so little ones don't choke or gag from getting the toothbrush too far into their mouths. Sometimes Ellie will run away from me with her toothbrush in her mouth, and the choke guard on this toothbrush makes that tiny act of rebellion at least a little bit safer.

The toothbrush also comes with a finger brush, which you can use for young babies who are just getting used to having their teeth brushed. The earlier you start this routine, the more receptive your baby might be to having their teeth brushed. You can even start brushing their gums gently with a finger brush before they have any teeth.

The toothbrush costs just $12.50 and comes in three colors— blush, teal, and gray. Ellie has a blush one.

Read more: Popular oral-care startup Quip has a new $25 electric toothbrush for kids — here's what it looks like and how it's different

Grabease

An added bonus

Grabease has also set up its own charity called PROJECT elli&nooli, and donates a portion of profits from sales and different campaigns to help women and children around the world. While the toothbrush isn't part of a philanthopic campaign at the moment, each set of its utensil set provides two meals to a child in need.

Cons to consider

The choke guard is great when Ellie is trying to brush her teeth herself — and especially when she runs away from me with her toothbrush in her mouth — but I find that it can get in the way when I try to brush her teeth for her. Specifically, when I brush her front teeth from side to side, the edge of the choke guard sometimes hits her face and stops me from being able to brush where I want more freely.

The bottom line

Grabease really hit the mark with this toothbrush and has found a way to give toddlers the autonomy they want with a safe and effective toothbrush.

But if you're not sold on this one, you can try the $19.99 Brusheez Electronic Toothbrush, which comes with a rinsing cup, sand timer, and a cute animal head to cover the toothbrush. This would be a fun option if you have an older toddler who doesn't want to brush his or her teeth because it's boring. The $10.98 Jordan Step 1 Baby Toothbrush is another option designed to prevent babies and toddlers from choking on the toothbrush, but also has an area for teething babies to chew on.

If you want to make the process of brushing your toddler's teeth a little bit easier, the Grabease can help. Even just providing something different that's new and exciting like this unique toothbrush can help your child get excited about brushing his or her teeth.

Pros: Reaches more teeth at once with double-sided brush head, choke guard makes it a safer product than traditional toothbrushes

Cons: Choke guard can sometimes gets in the way

Buy the Double Sided Toothbrush from Grabease for $12.50

Amazon employees send letter protesting ties with Palantir, ICE camps - Business Insider

Posted: 11 Jul 2019 04:09 PM PDT

On Monday, a group of Amazon employees sent out an internal email calling on Amazon to stop working with the big data company Palantir, which works with federal agency Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

This email, sent to employee mailing lists within Amazon Web Services, demanded that Palantir be removed from Amazon's cloud for violating its terms of service. It also called on Amazon to take a stand against ICE by making a statement establishing its position against immigration raids, deportations, and camps for migrants at the border.

ICE is preparing to begin nationwide raids of undocumented families on Sunday, the New York Times reported. This operation had previously been postponed.

"The world is watching the abuses in ICE's concentration camps unfold. We know that our company should, and can, do better," the letter said.

Amazon did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Palantir, a prominent data analysis startup that counts several government agencies as customers, has a $51 million contract with ICE, which reports indicate entails providing software to gather data on undocumented immigrants' employment information, phone records, immigration history, and similar information. Its software is hosted in the AWS cloud.

The letter alleges that this is a violation of the AWS terms of service, which states that "[a]ny activities that are illegal, that violate the rights of others, or that may be harmful to others, our operations or reputation" may be grounds to "suspend or terminate" use of our services.

The letter said that Palantir enables ICE to "violate the rights of others," and working with the company is "harmful to our reputation."

The employees say in the letter that their protest is in the spirit of similar action at companies including Wayfair, Microsoft, and Salesforce, where workers have protested their employers' ties to ICE and US Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

"Workers across industries continue to resist having their labor used to power these abuses and Amazonians are proud to stand with them. Employees at Wayfair have walked out in protest of their company's contract with ICE, while Microsoft and Salesforce employees are organizing to stop their companies' respective border contracts. The time to act is now," the letter said.

"When members of Congress visited a facility recently, they learned that detained women were 'told by agents to drink from the toilets' if they wanted water. This is a horrifying violation of human rights — and it's powered by AWS," the letter said, alluding to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's reports from her tour of a CBP facility in Texas.

A person familiar with the matter tells Business Insider that the letter has sparked fierce debates on the employee mailing lists.

Meanwhile, on Thursday, protesters blocked traffic at an AWS Summit event in New York City and interrupted Amazon CTO Werner Vogels' talk, demanding that the cloud platform cut ties with ICE, ABC7NY reported.

The last letter

The origins of this week's letter date back to June 2018, when a group of Amazon employees sent a letter to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and AWS CEO Andy Jassy demanding that the company stop providing its Rekognition facial recognition software to police, and that it stop its dealings with Palantir.

That original letter was signed by 500 employees, according to the new letter circulated this week.

This new letter claims that Jassy responded to these concerns at an all-hands meeting, saying that Amazon had no intention of making changes to its Rekognition business. According to the letter, Jassy later said: "Just because tech could be be misused doesn't mean we should ban it and condemn it."

Just May, protesters demonstrated at Amazon's shareholder meeting over the treatment of its employees and environmental issues.

Read the full letter below:

In June 2018, a group of concerned Amazonians sent a letter to Jeff Bezos and Andy Jassy, demanding that AWS:

1. Cease sales of surveillance technology to law enforcement and government agencies

2. Stop providing infrastructure to Palantir and any other Amazon partners who enable ICE, and

3. Implement strong transparency accountability measures for the sale and user of our services.

Since then, the company has shied away at every opportunity from acknowledging this letter signed by more than 500 employees. When confronted on these questions at a company all hands, Andy Jassy said "we feel really great and really strongly about the value that Amazon Rekognition is providing our custom res of all sizes and types of industries in law enforcement, and out of law enforcement." More recently, he added that "just because tech could be be misused doesn't mean we should ban it and condemn it," comparing Rekognition to a knife: "you could use a knife in a surreptitious way." As Amazonians, we are told to take Ownership for our work, meaning we "never say 'that's not my job.'" Passing the buck on responsibility for the effects of our work is not Ownership.

Our demands have become even more urgent given recent news. The US government has been detaining people, including young children, in concentration camps under horrific conditions. Reports have described extreme overcrowding (one facility was holding 900 people, in a space designed for only 125), freezing temperatures (facilities are regularly referred to as "hieleras" or "iceboxes"), and cruelty from guards at these detention centers. When members of Congress visited a facility recently, they learned that detained women were "told by agents to drink from the toilets" if they wanted water. This is a horrifying violation of human rights -- and it's powered by AWS.

Palantir, which runs on AWS services, provides the technical infrastructure used by ICE to collect and process information about people targeted for deportation. A 2016 court disclosure revealed that Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO), the primary deportation arm of ICE, uses Palantir's systems to gather information for its cases.

The AWS Acceptable Use Policy states that "[a]ny activities that are illegal, that violate the rights of others, or that may be harmful to others, our operations or reputation" may be grounds to "suspend or terminate" use of our services.

Palantir directly enables ICE to "violate the rights of others" by powering the deportation processes that are rounding up immigrants and putting them in concentration camps. Additionally, hosting Palantir is "harmful to our reputation" because it hurts customer trust and leads to negative publicity. By continuing to host Palantir despite clear documentation of ongoing rights abuses that result from their products, AWS is choosing not to enforce its Terms of Service.

AWS has already kicked other customers off the platform for similar violations. WikiLeaks was kicked off for potentially "putting innocent pe eople in jeopardy." If WikiLeaks crossed a line by posting leaked documents (because AWS felt they might contribute to harm), Palantir has certainly crossed that line by directly collaborating with an agency that is demonstrably putting vulnerable people in jeopardy.

Workers across industries continue to resist having their labor used to power these abuses and Amazonians are proud to stand with them. Employees at Wayfair have walked out in protest of their company's contract with ICE, while Microsoft and Salesforce employees are organizing to stop their companies' respective border contracts. The time to act is now.

We demand that Palantir be removed from AWS for its violation of our terms of service. We call on Amazon to take a public stand against these human rights violations and make a statement establishing their position against the ICE camps, mass raids, and deportations.

The world is watching the abuses in ICE's concentration camps unfold. We know that our company should, and can, do better.

Join us in calling for a stop to our collaboration with ICE by signing onto the We Won't Build It Letter.

Got a tip? Contact this reporter via email at rmchan@businessinsider.com, Telegram at @rosaliechan, or Twitter DM at @rosaliechan17. (PR pitches by email only, please.) Other types of secure messaging available upon request. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop.

Paul Ryan said he wanted to 'scold Trump all the time' - Business Insider

Posted: 11 Jul 2019 07:32 AM PDT

A coming book reportedly quotes former House Speaker Paul Ryan as saying that he frequently had the urge to "scold" President Donald Trump because "he didn't know anything about government."

Ryan, who experienced a meteoric rise through the ranks of the House by forging a reputation as a savvy and knowledgeable policy wonk, was in for a rude awakening when Trump took office, according to a Washington Post report on the Politico correspondent Tim Alberta's forthcoming book, "American Carnage," which The Post says prominently features several quotes from Ryan.

"I told myself I gotta have a relationship with this guy to help him get his mind right," Ryan told Alberta, according to The Post. "Because, I'm telling you, he didn't know anything about government ... I wanted to scold him all the time."

According to a separate excerpt of Alberta's book previously published in Politico Magazine, Ryan was so horrified by the October 2016 release of a 2005 "Access Hollywood" tape in which Trump bragged about sexually assaulting women that he canceled a planned campaign event with Trump in Wisconsin and begged the Republican National Committee chair at the time, Reince Priebus, to find a way to replace Trump as the Republican presidential nominee and "excommunicate him" from the party.

Ryan, who retired from the House in 2018 and is now a private citizen, apparently didn't hold back on his opinions on Trump in several on-the-record quotes for the story.

Read more: Paul Ryan said Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez ignored his advice to 'just take it easy' as a new member of Congress

Once Trump was elected, Ryan tried his best to accommodate Trump's bombastic, off-the-cuff style of governing. In one instance reported by Alberta, Trump was displeased that a 2018 spending package didn't include funding for his desired border wall, and he signed it only on the condition that Ryan allow him some time to generate suspense for the bill on Twitter.

Ryan told Alberta he and other officials "really helped to stop him from making bad decisions," according to The Post, adding: "We helped him make much better decisions, which were contrary to kind of what his knee-jerk reaction was. Now I think he's making some of these knee-jerk reactions."

Alberta said Trump didn't harbor warm feelings toward Ryan either, referring to him as a "f---ing Boy Scout" over the squeaky-clean image Ryan cultivated.

"We've gotten so numbed by it all," Ryan reportedly mused about Trump's behavior. "Not in government, but where we live our lives, we have a responsibility to try and rebuild. Don't call a woman a 'horse face.' Don't cheat on your wife. Don't cheat on anything. Be a good person. Set a good example."

"American Carnage: On the Front Lines of the Republican Civil War and the Rise of President Trump" is set to be released by the publisher Harper next Tuesday.

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