Thursday, February 28, 2019

business owner

business owner


Moberly business owner accused of child sex abuse, assault - ktvo.com

Posted: 28 Feb 2019 06:20 AM PST

The owner of a Moberly frozen custard shop has been charged with assault and promoting a child for sexual performance. Dale Baker is now at the Livingston County Jail on a $75,000 bond (Photo: Livingston County Sheriff's Office)

The owner of a Moberly frozen custard shop has been charged with assault and promoting a child for sexual performance.

According to court documents obtained by our sister station, KRCG, Dale Barker, 43, of Chillicothe, Missouri, was charged with one count of first-degree assault for allegedly using a taser on children who were left in his care.

One victim told authorities that Barker had deployed the taser on on several children and that he kept the device in his truck.

The victim, who is 13 years old, said Barker bit another child victim's genitals, making them bleed. A child victim later confirmed that Barker had bitten his genitalia so hard it bled onto the floor.

The court documents went on to say the a victim also told police that their mother sometimes left "the boys" with Barker when she traveled to California and said it was during those times that Barker made his brothers do "nasty stuff."

Another girl said that on one occasion Barker hit her with her cell phone and "busted her face open."

Barker owns Anne Marie's Frozen Custard in Moberly, and is currently being held at the Livingston County Jail on a $75,000 bond.

As a clarification, Barker does not own the building in which the frozen custard shop is located. He is a tenant of that building.

Local business owner upset over speeders near his tavern - WHIO

Posted: 28 Feb 2019 11:31 AM PST

Published: Thursday, February 28, 2019 @ 2:31 PM
Updated: Thursday, February 28, 2019 @ 2:33 PM

Tony Allison, owner of the Villa Tavern on Rip Rap Road, is fed up the amount of speeders that are constantly flying by his parking lot. 

RELATED: See more trending stories on WHIO.com

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Allison says speeders constantly hit cars and bikes in his parking lot and he is speaking out because he wants something to be done to correct the issue. 

Live Doppler 7 Radar | INTERACTIVE

Allison says he is worried someone is going to get seriously hurt. News Center 7 is talking to Allison and other business owners on this busy street and a full report can be seen on WHIO-TV beginning at 5 p.m. 

Moberly business owner charged with child sex crimes - khqa.com

Posted: 28 Feb 2019 02:15 AM PST

Dale Barker of Chillicothe, the owner of a frozen custard franchise is Moberly, is charged with numerous crimes against children, including assault and multiple sexual crimes. (Livingston County Sheriff's Office)

The owner of a Moberly frozen custard shop has been charged with assault and promoting a child sexual performance.

According to court documents, 43-year-old Dale Barker was charged with one count of first-degree assault for allegedly using a Taser on children who were left in his care. One victim told authorities that Barker had deployed the Taser on on several children and that he kept the device in his truck. The victim, who is 13 years old, said Barker bit another child victim's genitals, making them bleed. A child victim later confirmed that Barker had bitten his genitalia so hard it bled onto the floor.

The victim also told of Barker shooting another victim in the neck with a pellet gun, beating children with a belt, and hitting one female victim "as hard as he could" with a belt.

One victim told police that their mother sometimes left "the boys" with Barker when she traveled to California. One victim said it was during these times that Barker made his brothers do "nasty stuff." Another girl said that on one occasion Barker hit her with her cell phone and "busted her face open."

Barker, of Chillicothe, owns Anne Marie's Frozen Custard in Moberly, and was held in the Livingston County Jail on a $75,000 bond.

Mundelein settles condemnation fight with downtown business owner - Chicago Daily Herald

Posted: 27 Feb 2019 10:05 AM PST

Mundelein officials and the owner of a recycling business have settled a condemnation fight that had landed in civil court.

The village will pay the eponymous owner of the Alan Josephsen Co., 101 E. Maple Ave., more than $1.3 million for his land. Josephsen will seek to relocate the business, likely out of town, Mayor Steve Lentz said.

The nearly 1.9-acre site is on the south side of Route 176 and just west of the Canadian National Railway tracks, on the east side of the town's downtown district.

The company has operated there since 1978, recycling paper, cardboard and other materials. It's one of the few industrial businesses in the downtown area.

Village officials want the business gone to encourage new retail or resident development of the site, which would be more fitting with the rest of the downtown area.

They tried to buy the land for years, but Josephsen refused to sell. The village started pursuing condemnation through eminent domain in 2017.

Lentz said officials are "very happy" with the settlement, which paves the way for Mundelein to find a company to buy and redevelop the site.

"Things are going to move forward," he said.

Reached by phone Wednesday, Josephsen declined to comment.

As part of the settlement, the business can stay put until January 2020 while it establishes a new home.

Village Administrator John Lobaito on Monday thanked Josephsen for reaching an agreement.

"It's not an easy thing for him to do," Lobaito said.

Four trustees approved the deal: Scott Black, Ray Semple, Bill Rekus and Dawn Abernathy. Trustee Robin Meier voted "present" without explanation.

Trustee Kerston Russell was absent.

A New Generation of Outdoor Business Owners - Flathead Beacon

Posted: 28 Feb 2019 08:45 AM PST

The wilds of Northwest Montana call to all types of people, from those living in big cities across the country to those living on the eastern flatlands across the state.

Big nature, especially dramatic in the jagged peaks and pure valleys of Glacier National Park, is a big driver of the local economy. Whitefish hosted the state's first-ever Business of Outdoor Recreation Summit in December last year, and the Outdoor Industry Association reported that outdoor recreation generates more than $7 billion per year in consumer spending in Montana.

For some, such as the owners of Glacier Raft Company, the Belton Chalet, and Swan Mountain Outfitters, that love of this place became a desire to stay and work so they could play here, and now, years after they've built on that opportunity, it's their children's turn.

The last few years have seen the changing of the guard in these outdoor recreation businesses, a transition of ownership from parents to the children raised in those environments. For the children, who are now adults, the shift comes with the knowledge that while they may now be at the helms of their respective family businesses, they are not alone in their journeys.

"It's a small, tightknit community up here," said Cassie Baldelli of Glacier Raft Company. "We all kind of know each other and know each other's parents."

Baldelli and her husband Jeff Baldelli became owners in the rafting company in 2012; her parents, Darwon and Terri Stoneman, were some of the business' founders in 1976, and estimate the raft company has taken at least 500,000 people down the river in the last four decades.

She said it's not been lost on her that the older guard of the outdoor industry is changing out with the new guard, and that it's a welcome sight to see so many businesses staying within families.

"It's great to see so many of them staying in the family," Baldelli said. "You still have the ability to go back and ask the questions to the people who know the answers, and you still have the guidance of people who have done it before."

Aubrie Lorona and her husband Erik Lorona are part of the recent change in ownership at Swan Mountain Outfitters, the only outfitter with a license to run trail rides in Glacier Park. Her parents, Pat and Joanne Tabor, started SMO almost 15 years ago, and the Loronas joined the endeavor three years in. Pat Tabor Jr. and his wife Megan Tabor are also involved, running the Swan division of the business while the Loronas run the northern operations.

As her parents shift out of the business, Lorona finds herself relying on their past experience but also the support from other newly minted business owners in Bad Rock Canyon who happen to know just what she's going through.

"As a younger business owner coming in, to be able to have a peer group that you can run things by and commiserate with and brainstorm is incredible," she said. "We're big believers that a rising tide lifts all ships; there's plenty of pie to go around. There isn't a whole lot of concern about competition, even among direct competitors."

Ken Wallace adjusts a load as he hauls gear out from Sperry Chalet with a team from Swan Mountain Outfitters. Beacon File Photo

The business community in Bad Rock Canyon is already a supportive one for this reason, Lorona said. With so many people flooding into the valley and the canyon over the summer — Glacier Park saw more than 3 million visitors in 2018 — there is enough business for everyone in those months. SMO took out 15,000 trail rides, she said, but that's a small fraction of the tourist pool.

The businesses work together to advance shoulder season opportunities as well, Lorona said.

Swan Mountain Outfitters would likely have had a much tougher time getting a snowmobile permit for the winter months had the business community not rallied for them, Lorona said as an example.

"Community in general is something we're really blessed with in the Flathead Valley," she said.

Andrew and Ali Steff-Baxter, pictured at the Belton Chalet on Jan. 4, 2019. Greg Lindstrom | Flathead Beacon

As some of the most recent new owners to join this group, Andrew and Ali Still-Baxter at the historic Belton Chalet in West Glacier came back to Montana after they'd been out in the corporate world to take over the family business from his parents, Cas Still and Andy Baxter.

Still-Baxter said they both realized the unique magic of the Belton and the opportunity to live and work at Glacier Park's western front door. They've been pleasantly surprised by the camaraderie of the other tourism-based businesses.

"It's such an interesting little climate and ecosystem," Still-Baxter said. "It is so small that we have to really rely on each other. All the relationships are symbiotic. We all know we're in it together and fighting for the well-being of the area together."

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